Google

PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">

Description

Spreadsheet::Excel - A module for generating Excel compatable files on any
platform.

Version 0.2.3, based on version .26 of Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.

Synopsis

require "spreadsheet/excel"
include Spreadsheet

workbook = Excel.new("test.xls")

# There are three ways to create a format
format = workbook.add_format(:color=>"blue",:bold=>1,:underline=>1)

format2 = Format.new(
   :color     => "green",
   :bold      => true,
   :underline => true
)
workbook.add_format(format2)

format3 = Format.new{ |f|
   f.color = "red"
   f.bold  = true
   f.underline = true
}
workbook.add_format(format3)

worksheet1 = workbook.add_worksheet
worksheet2 = workbook.add_worksheet("Numbers")
worksheet3 = workbook.add_worksheet("Text")

worksheet1.write(0,0,"Hello",format)
worksheet1.write(1,1,["Matz","Larry","Guido"])

worksheet2.write(1,3,8876,format2)
worksheet2.write_column(4,4,[1,2,3])

worksheet3.write(2,2,"World",format3)
worksheet3.write(3,3,[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]])

workbook.close

Classes

Excel

Excel#new(<filename>)

Returns a workbook object. You may only have one workbook per file. A .xls extension for your filename is recommended but not enforced.

Excel#VERSION

Returns the current version of the module as a string.

Workbook

Workbook#add_worksheet(<sheet name>)

Adds a worksheet to the workbook object. You may optionally pass a sheet name. Otherwise, it will default to 'Sheet1', 'Sheet2', etc.

Workbook#add_format(<attributes|Format object>)

Adds a Format to the workbook. When included as part of the 'write' method, the cells specified are formatted appropriately.

See the synopsis above for different ways to add formats.

Workbook#close

Closes the workbook (and the file). Be sure to do this.

Worksheet

Worksheet#write(row,column,value,<format>)

Writes data to the cell you provide. If <value> is an Array, the write_row method is called internally.

If <value> is a multi-dimensional array, then each element of the array is written within its own row at the appropriate column. In other words, it's written to the spreadsheet in the same manner you would visualize it.

If a format is provided, the cells are each formatted appropriately.

Worksheet#write_row(row,column,Array,<format>)

Writes a row of data starting at <row> and <column> in a left to right manner, with one array element per cell.

Any formatting will be applied to each cell.

Worksheet#write_column(row,column,Array,<format>)

Writes a column of data starting at <row> and <column> in a top to bottom manner, with one array element per cell.

Any formattnig will be applied to each cell.

Format

Format#new({attributes})

Creates a new Format object. See the Format documentation for details.

Notes

This is a port of John McNamara's Spreadsheet::WriteExcel module, version .26
There is no support for formulas yet.

Design Changes

The only somewhat major change was to make OLEWriter a subclass of File,
rather than store a filehandle as an attribute within the class.  This
seems to have worked out fine.

Other changes consisted mostly of minor code optimizations.  Occasionally
I was more terse than John was (for better or for worse).

Questions

Questions about MS Excel should be directed to Microsoft.
Questions about the MS Excel format should be directed to Microsoft.
Questions about why I use the hex values that I use should be directed to
John McNamara (jmcnamara at cpan dot org).

Future Plans

Add support for files > 7MB
Add formulas.
Better install/configuration
Add comments - for now you can find all appropriate comments in John's
module. ;)

Thanks

Many thanks go to John McNamara for his tireless dedication to a very useful
(and probably very popular) module.  I also thank him for taking the time
to answer some of the questions I had for him while porting his code.

Copyright

 2002-2003, Daniel J. Berger

All Rights Reserved. This module is free software. It may be used,
redistributed and/or modified under the same terms as Ruby itself.

Author

Daniel J. Berger
djberg96 at yahoo dot com